Supported Languages

ABBYY FineReader 10 supports 186 languages.

ABBYY FineReader supports the following languages*:

Main Languages

The distinctive feature of the main languages is that ABBYY FineReader provides dictionary support for them. You can use ABBYY FineReader spell checker to check texts written in these languages.

  • Armenian (Eastern, Western, Grabar)
    An Indo-European language forming its own group. The official language of Armenia, spoken also in Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Russia. Grabar, the old literary Armenian language is now used exclusively as the language of the clergy. The modern literary language has two main varieties — Eastern (Yerevan), spoken in Armenia, and Western, spoken in the Near East and in Western Europe. A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Bashkir
    A Turkic language. Spoken in Russia (Bashkiriya and nearby regions). A mother tongue for some 1 million people.
  • Bulgarian
    A South Slavic language. The official language of Bulgaria. A mother tongue for some 9 million people.
  • Catalan
    A Romance language (Ibero-Romance subgroup). A mother tongue for some 8 million people in Spain (Catalonia, Valencia, the Balearic Islands), France (Roussillon, East Pyrenees), Andorra, and Sardinia. One of the official languages of the above-stated Spanish provinces and Andorra.
  • Croatian
    A South Slavic language. Considered to be the same language as Serbian (forming the single Serbo-Croatian language, the only difference being in the spelling system used — Cyrillic for Serbian and Latin for Croatian) until the emergence of an independent Croatia. The official language of Croatia. A mother tongue for some 5 million people.
  • Czech
    A West Slavic language. The official language of the Czech Republic, spoken also in Slovakia. A mother tongue for some 12 million people.
  • Danish
    A Germanic (Scandinavian) language. The official language of Denmark, spoken also in Greenland and the Faroe Islands. A mother tongue for some 5.5 million people.
  • Dutch (Netherlands and Belgium)
    A Germanic language. The official language of the Netherlands and Belgium. A mother tongue for some 20 million people.
  • English
    A Germanic language. A major international language. A UN language. The official language of the USA, Canada, Great Britain, Ireland (together with Irish), Australia, New Zealand, India (with temporary status) and 15 African states including the Republic of South Africa, Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda and some others. A mother tongue for some 410 million people. Spoken by some 1 billion people worldwide.
  • Estonian
    A Finno-Ugric (Baltic-Finnic) language. The official language of Estonia. A mother tongue for some 1.1 million people.
  • Finnish
    A Finno-Ugric (Baltic-Finnic) language. The official language of Finland, spoken also in Russia (Karelia and St. Petersburg Region) and Sweden. A mother tongue for some 6 million people.
  • French
    A Romance language. A UN language. The official language of France, Belgium, Switzerland, Luxemburg, Monaco, Andorra, Canada, Haiti, and a number of African states: Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Gabon, Guinea, Zaire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Congo-Brazzaville, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Togo, Tchad, Burundi, Rwanda, the Central African Republic, Madagascar, Cameroon, Seychelles, Comoros, Jibuti, Vanuatu (Oceania). A mother tongue for more than 128 million people.
  • German (new and old spelling)
    A Germanic language. The official language of Germany, Austria, and Liechtenstein and one of the official languages of Switzerland, Luxemburg, and Belgium. A mother tongue for some 128 million people.
  • Greek
    An Indo-European language forming its own group. The official language of Greece and Cyprus. A mother tongue for some 12 million people.
  • Hebrew
    A Semitic language. The official language of Israel. Also spoken in some Jewish communities of the diaspora. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Hungarian
    An Ugric (Uralic) language. The official language of Hungary, spoken also in nearby counties, including Serbia, Austria, Slovakia, Romania, and Ukraine. A mother tongue for some 14.5 million people.
  • Indonesian
    An Austronesian language called Malay (some scientists consider it to be a dialect of Malay) before 1945. The official language of Indonesia under the name Bahasa Indonesia, used also for international communication. A mother tongue for some 160 million people.
  • Italian
    A Romance language. The official language of Italy. A mother tongue for some 70 million people.
  • Latvian
    A Baltic language. The official language of Latvia. A mother tongue for some 2 million people.
  • Lithuanian
    A Baltic language. The official language of Lithuania. A mother tongue for some 4 million people.
  • Norwegian (Nynorsk and Bokmal)
    A Germanic (Scandinavian) language. The official language of Norway. The literary language exists in two forms — Nynorsk and Bokmal (the latter is closer to Danish). A mother tongue for some 5 million people.
  • Polish
    A West Slavic language. The official language of Poland. A mother tongue for some 44 million people.
  • Portuguese (Portugal and Brazil)
    A Romance language. The official language of Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, Cape Verde, and Sao Tome and Principe. A mother tongue for some 191 million people.
  • Romanian
    A Romance language. The official language of Romania. A mother tongue for some 26 million people.
  • Russian
    An East Slavic language. The official language of the Russian Federation, spoken also in all CIS and Baltic states. A mother tongue for some 277 million people.
  • Slovak
    A West Slavic language. The official language of Slovakia, spoken also in nearby regions of Hungary, Romania, and Ukraine. A mother tongue for some 5.6 million people.
  • Slovenian
    A South Slavic language. The official language of Slovenia, spoken also in nearby regions of Austria and Italy. A mother tongue for some 2 million people.
  • Spanish
    A Romance language. The official language of Spain, all Latin American countries (save Brazil) and Equatorial Guinea. A UN language. A mother tongue for some 360 million people.
  • Swedish
    A Germanic (Scandinavian) language. The official language of Sweden and Finland. A mother tongue for some 10 million people.
  • Tatar
    A Turkic language. Spoken in Russia (Tatarstan, Bashkir, Chuvashiya, Mari El, and some other areas). A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Thai
    A South East Thai language. The official language of Thailand. A mother tongue for some 30 million people.
  • Turkish
    A Turkic language. The official language of Turkey and Cyprus, spoken also in Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Iran, and Iraq. A mother tongue for some 61 million people.
  • Ukrainian
    An East Slavic language. The official language of Ukraine, spoken also in Russia and Byelorussia. A mother tongue for some 47 million people.

Asian Languages

  • Chinese (PRC), Chinese (Taiwan)
    A Sino-Tibetan language. The official language of the People’s Republic of China, Taiwan, and one of the official languages of the Republic of Singapore. A mother tongue for over 1 billion people.
  • Japanese
    The official language of Japan (130 million speakers). There also some speakers of Japanese in the USA (about 1 million speakers in Hawaii), Brazil, Peru, China, Canada, Argentine, Mexico, and some other countries. Links of Japanese with other languages have been a matter of scholarly debate. Currently most linguists link Japanese to the Altaic languages.
  • Korean, Korean (Hangul)
    Presumably an Altaic language. Spoken throughout the Korean Peninsula and in China, Japan, USA, Russia and countries of Central Asia. A mother tongue for some 80 million people.

Additional Languages

  • Abkhaz
    An Abkhazo-Adyghe (Caucasian) language. Spoken in Georgia (Abkhazia). A mother tongue for some 105 thousand people.
  • Adyghe
    An Abkhazo-Adyghe (Caucasian) language. Spoken in Russia (Adyghea and Krasnodar Region). A mother tongue for some 120 thousand people.
  • Afrikaans
    A Germanic language. One of the official languages of the Republic of South Africa. A mother tongue for some 6.5 million South African Afrikaners (Boers), descendants of Dutch colonists.
  • Agul
    A Lezgian (Dagestanian) language. Spoken in Russia (Dagestan and Stavropol Region) and Azerbaijan. A mother tongue for some 15 thousand people.
  • Albanian
    An Indo-European language forming its own group. The official language of Albania. A mother tongue for some 5 million people in Albania, Serbia (Kosovo), Italy, and Greece.
  • Altai
    A Turkic language. Spoken in Russia (Altai). A mother tongue for some 5
    5 thousand people.
  • Avar
    An Avar-Andi-Dido (Dagestanian) language. Spoken in Russia (Dagestan) and Azerbaijan. A mother tongue for some 600 thousand people.
  • Aymara
    A Quechumaran language (one of the languages of South American Indians). One of the three official languages of Bolivia. A mother tongue for some 2.2 million Aymara Indians living in Peru and Bolivia. Most Aymara speakers speak also Quechua and Spanish. Some scientists prefer to treat Aymara not as a single language with some 10 dialects but as an Aymara language group.
  • Azeri (Cyrillic), Azeri (Latin)
    A Turkic language. The official language of Azerbaijan. A mother tongue for some 14-20 million people in Iran, Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Georgia.
  • Basque
    An isolate language. A mother tongue for some 600 thousand people in Spain and France.
  • Belarusian
    An East Slavic language. The official language of Byelorussia. A mother tongue for some 10.2 million people.
  • Bemba
    A Bantu language. A mother tongue for some 5 million people in Zambia, Zaire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Congo-Brazzaville, and Tanzania.
  • Blackfoot
    A West Algonkian language. A mother tongue for less than 10 thousand Indians in the USA and Canada.
  • Breton
    A Brythonic (Celtic) language. A mother tongue for some 1 million Bretons in France.
  • Bugotu
    An Oceanic language (member of Malayo-Polynesian branch of Austronesian languages) spoken in the South-East Solomon Islands.
  • Buryat
    A Mongolian language. Spoken in Russia (Buryatia). A mother tongue for some 422 thousand people.
  • Cebuano
    A Philippinean (Austronesian) language. Spoken in the central Philippines. Usually considered to be a group of closely related languages (Bisayan). A mother tongue for some 24 million people.
  • Chamorro
    An Austronesian language spoken in Western Micronesia, particularly on the island of Guam. A mother tongue for some 78 thousand people.
  • Chechen
    A Nakh (Caucasian) language. A mother tongue for some 1 million people in Russia (Chechnya, Ingushetia, and Dagestan).
  • Chukchee
    A Luorawetlan language spoken in Russia (Chukchee and Koryak Regions). A mother tongue for some 10 thousand people.
  • Chuvash
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Chuvashiya). A mother tongue for some 2 million people.
  • Corsican
    Usually considered to be a dialect of Italian, spoken on the island of Corsica. A mother tongue for some 341 thousand people.
  • Crimean Tatar
    A Turkic language spoken in Ukraine (the Crimea). A mother tongue for some 700 thousand people.
  • Crow
    A Siouan language spoken in Montana, USA. A mother tongue for less than 10 thousand people.
  • Dakota
    A Siouan language spoken in the Northern USA (South Dakota, Montana). A mother tongue for some 20 thousand people.
  • Dargwa
    A Dagestanian language. Spoken in Russia (Dagestan). A mother tongue for some 360 thousand people.
  • Dungan
    A Sino-Tibetan language spoken in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan. A mother tongue for some 50 thousand people.
  • Eskimo (Cyrillic), Eskimo (Latin)
    An Eskimo-Aleut language. Spoken in the South-East of the Chukchee Peninsula (Russia), Alaska and nearby regions (USA), the Arctic regions of Canada, and in Greenland. A mother tongue for some 100 thousand people.
  • Even
    A Manchu-Tungus language spoken in Russia (Okhotsk, Yakutia, and Magadan Region). A mother tongue for some 5 thousand people.
  • Evenki
    A Manchu-Tungus language spoken in China, Russia (from the Yenisey to Sakhalin), Mongolia. A mother tongue for some 30 thousand people (in Russia for some 10 thousand).
  • Faroese
    A Germanic (Scandinavian) language. The official language of the Faroe Islands (autonomous Danish possession), spoken also in some other regions of Denmark. A mother tongue for some 47 thousand people.
  • Fijian
    An Austronesian language spoken in Fiji. A mother tongue for some 350 thousand people.
  • Frisian
    A Germanic language spoken in Noord-Holland and Friesland (the Netherlands), North Frisian Islands, the island of Helgoland, and Saterland (Germany). A mother tongue for some 730 thousand people.
  • Friulian
    A Romance language. Usually considered to be a Rhaeto-Romance language. Spoken in Friuli-Venezia Giulia (Italy). A mother tongue for some 700 thousand people.
  • Gagauz
    A Turkic language spoken in Southern Moldavia. A mother tongue for some 180 thousand people.
  • Galician
    A Romance language frequently referred to as a dialect of Spanish or Portuguese, spoken in Spain (Galicia). A mother tongue for some 4 million people.
  • Ganda
    A Bantu language spoken in Uganda. A mother tongue for some 4 million people.
  • German (Luxemburg)
    One of the official languages of Luxemburg (also called Luxembourgian). Usually considered to be a Moselle-Franconian dialect of German.
  • Guarani
    A Tupian language spoken in Paraguay and nearby regions of Brazil, Argentina, and Bolivia. A mother tongue for some 5 million Guarani Indians.
  • Hani
    A Sino-Tibetan (Lolo-Burmish) language spoken in China, North Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam. Also called Akha. A mother tongue for some 1 million people.
  • Hausa
    A Afro-Asiatic language. Spoken in Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Ghana, Benin, and Togo. A mother tongue for some 40 million people.
  • Hawaiian
    An Austronesian (Polynesian) language spoken in Hawaii. A mother tongue for some 20 thousand people.
  • Icelandic
    A Germanic (Scandinavian) language. The official language of Iceland. A mother tongue for some 250 thousand people.
  • Ingush
    A Nakh language spoken in Ingushetia. A mother tongue for some 200 thousand people.
  • Irish
    A Celtic language. The first official language of Ireland. A mother tongue for less than 260 thousand people.
  • Jingpo
    A Tibeto-Burman language spoken in South China and Myanmar. A mother tongue for some 600 thousand people.
  • Kabardian
    An Abkhazo-Adyghian (Caucasian) language spoken in Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessia, North Ossetia (Mozdok), and Adyghea and the neighboring areas of the Krasnodar and Stavropol Regions. A mother tongue for some 300 thousand people.
  • Kalmyk
    A Mongolian language spoken in Russia (Kalmykia). A mother tongue for some 140 thousand people.
  • Karachay-Balkar
    A Turkic language (some scientists prefer to consider this language to be made up of two separate but closely related Karachay and Balkar languages) spoken in Russia (Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay-Cherkessia). A mother tongue for some 200 thousand people.
  • Karakalpak
    A Turkic language spoken in Karakalpakiya (Uzbekistan). A mother tongue for some 410 thousand people.
  • Kasub
    Usually considered a dialect of Polish, spoken in Poland.
  • Kawa
    A Kadai language (considered to be related both to Thai and Austronesian languages) spoken in China. A mother tongue for less than 50 thousand people.
  • Kazakh
    A Turkic language. The official language of Kazakhstan. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Khakass
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Khakasiya). A mother tongue for some 60 thousand people.
  • Khanty
    An Ugric language spoken in Russia (Tyumen and Tomsk Regions). A mother tongue for some 15 thousand people.
  • Kikuyu
    A Bantu language spoken in central Kenya. A mother tongue for some 6 million people.
  • Kirghiz
    A Turkic language. The official language of Kyrgyzstan, spoken also in China. A mother tongue for some 2.6 million people.
  • Kongo
    A Bantu language spoken in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Congo-Brazzaville, and Angola. A mother tongue for some 10 million people.
  • Koryak
    A Luorawetlan language spoken in Russia (Koryak Region). A mother tongue for some 5 thousand people.
  • Kpelle
    A Mande (Niger-Congo) language spoken in G
    uinea and Liberia. A mother tongue for less than 1 million people.
  • Kumyk
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Dagestan). A mother tongue for some 282 thousand people.
  • Kurdish
    A West Iranian language. The second official language of Iraq. Spoken in Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria, and CIS states (Kurdish diaspora). A mother tongue for some 20 million people.
  • Lak
    A Dagestanian language spoken in Russia (Dagestan). A mother tongue for some 100 thousand people.
  • Latin
    An Italic language. The official language of Vatican and of classical Roman literature.
  • Lezgi
    A Dagestanian language spoken in Russia (Dagestan) and Azerbaijan. A mother tongue for some 450 thousand people.
  • Luba
    A Bantu language spoken in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A mother tongue for some 6 million people.
  • Macedonian
    A South Slavic language. The official language of Macedonia. A mother tongue for some 2 million people.
  • Malagasy
    An Austronesian language. The official language of Madagascar. A mother tongue for some 10 million people.
  • Malay
    An Austronesian language. The official language of Malaysia. A mother tongue for some 20 million people.
  • Malinke
    A Mande (Niger-Congo) language. Spoken in Senegal, Guinea, Mali, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. A mother tongue for some 4 million people.
  • Maltese
    A Semitic language. The official language of Malta. A mother tongue for some 400 thousand people.
  • Mansi
    An Ugric language spoken in Russia (West Siberia). A mother tongue for some 4 thousand people.
  • Maori
    A Polynesian language spoken in New Zealand. A mother tongue for some 300 thousand people.
  • Mari
    A common name for two closely related languages – Plain Mari and Mountain Mari. Spoken in Russia (Mari El, Tatariya). A Finno-Ugric (Uralic) language. A mother tongue for some 600 thousand people.
  • Maya
    A Maya language spoken in Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras. A mother tongue for some 1 million Indians.
  • Miao
    A Myao-Yao language spoken in China, Vietnam, and parts of in Laos and Thailand. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Minangkabau
    An Austronesian language spoken on Sumatra (central and Western regions). A mother tongue for some 6.5 million people.
  • Mohawk
    An Iroquoian language spoken in the North-East USA and nearby regions of Canada (around Ontario and Erie lakes). A mother tongue for some 10 thousand people.
  • Moldavian
    A Romance language. The official language of Moldavia. Usually considered to be a variety of Romanian. A mother tongue for some 3 million people.
  • Mongol
    A Mongolian language. The official language of Mongolia, spoken also in China (Inner Mongolia). A mother tongue for some 5 million people.
  • Mordvin
    A common name for two closely related languages: Moksha-Mordvin and Erzya-Mordvin. A Volga-Finnic (Uralic) language. Spoken in Russia (Mordvinia). A mother tongue for some 1 million people.
  • Nahuatl
    An Aztec-Tanoan language. Spoken in Mexico. A mother tongue for some 1 million people.
  • Nenets
    A Samoyedic (Uralic) language spoken in Russia (Yamalo-Nenets and Dolgano-Nenets Regions). A mother tongue for some 25 thousand people.
  • Nivkh
    An isolated language spoken in Russia (Sakhalin and Amur Region). A mother tongue for some 1 thousand people.
  • Nogay
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Karachay-Cherkessia and Krasnodar Region). A mother tongue for some 55 thousand people.
  • Nyanja
    A Bantu language. The official language of Malawi, spoken also in Zambia, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe. A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Ojibway
    An Algonkian language spoken in the USA and Canada. A mother tongue for several thousand Indians.
  • Ossetian
    An East Iranian language. Spoken in Russia (North Ossetia) and Georgia (South Osse
    tia). A mother tongue for some 600 thousand people.
  • Papiamento
    A Spanish-based creole language. Spoken on Aruba, Bonaire, and the Curacao Islands. A mother tongue for less than 1 million people.
  • Provencal
    A Romance language spoken in South France and in the Italian Alps. A mother tongue for some 2-10 million people.
  • Quechua
    A Quechumaran language. One of the official languages of Peru and Bolivia, spoken also in Ecuador, North Colombia, Chile, and Argentina. A mother tongue for 7-13 million Indians.
  • Rhaeto-Romance
    A Romance language. One of the official languages of Switzerland. A mother tongue for some 40 thousand people (Graubünden canton).
  • Romany
    An Indian language spoken by the Gypsy diaspora throughout the world. A mother tongue for 1-5 million people.
  • Rundi
    A Bantu language. One of the official languages of Burundi, spoken also in Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Russian (old spelling)
    The Russian language that uses an old spelling system (as spelt before the revolution of 1917).
  • Rwanda
    A Bantu language. One of the official languages of Rwanda, spoken also in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda, and Tanzania. A mother tongue for some 12 million people.
  • Sami (Lappish)
    A Finno-Ugric language spoken in North Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia (Kola Peninsula). A mother tongue for some 50 thousand people.
  • Samoan
    A Polynesian language. One of the official languages of Western Samoa. A mother tongue for some 430 thousand people.
  • Scottish Gaelic
    A Celtic language spoken in Scotland, the Hebrides, and in Nova Scotia (Canada). A mother tongue for less than 100 thousand people.
  • Selkup
    A Samoyedic (Uralic) language spoken in Russia (Krasnoyarsk and Tomsk Regions). A mother tongue for some 2 thousand people.
  • Serbian (Cyrillic), Serbian (Latin)
    A South Slavic language (see also Croatian). The official language of Serbia and Montenegro. A mother tongue for some 20 million people.
  • Shona
    A Bantu language spoken in Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Botswana, and the Republic of South Africa. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Somali
    An Afro-Asiatic (Cushitic) language. The official language of Somali, spoken also in Jibuti, Ethiopia, and Kenya. A mother tongue for some 9 million people.
  • Sorbian
    A West Slavic language. Usually considered to be made up of two languages — Upper Sorbian and Lower Sorbian. Spoken in Germany (Saxony). A mother tongue for some 100 thousand people.
  • Sotho
    A Bantu language. One of the official languages of Lesotho, spoken also in the Republic of South Africa. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Sunda
    An Austronesian language spoken in Indonesia (Western Java). A mother tongue for some 27 million people.
  • Swahili
    A Bantu language. A main language of international communication (a commercial lingua franca) in central and East Africa (particularly in Tanzania and Kenya). The official language of Uganda. A mother tongue for 10-50 million people.
  • Swazi
    A Bantu language. The official language of Swaziland, spoken also in the North-East of the Republic of South Africa. A mother tongue for some 2 million people.
  • Tabasaran
    A Dagestanian language spoken in Russia (Dagestan). A mother tongue for some 75 thousand people.
  • Tagalog
    A Philippinean (Austronesian) language. The official language of the Philippines. A mother tongue for some 57 million people.
  • Tahitian
    A Polynesian (Austronesian) language. The official language of French Polynesia, spoken also in New Caledonia and Vanuatu. A mother tongue for some 117 thousand people.
  • Tajik
    An Iranian language. The official language of Tajikistan, spoken also in Uzbekistan. A mother tongue for some 4.5 million people.
  • Tok Pisin
    An English-based creole language. The official language of Papua New Guinea. A mother tongue for some 3 million people.
  • Tongan
    A Polynesian (Austronesian) language. The official language of Tonga, spoken also in New Zealand, Fiji, and Western Samoa. A mother tongue for some 120 thousand people.
  • Tswana
    A Bantu language. Spoken in Botswana and the Republic of South Africa. One of the official languages of Botswana. A mother tongue for some 4 million people.
  • Tun
    A Thai language spoken in south China. A mother tongue for some 700 thousand people.
  • Turkmen
    A Turkic language. The official language of Turkmenistan. A mother tongue for some 6.5 million people.
  • Tuvinian
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Tuva). A mother tongue for some 240 thousand people.
  • Udmurt
    A Permian language spoken in Russia (Udmurtia and Kirovsk Region). A mother tongue for some 550 thousand people.
  • Uighur (Cyrillic), Uighur (Latin)
    A Turkic language spoken by Uighurs in the Uighur Autonomous Region of Sinkiang of North-Western China and in portions of Uzbekistan, Kazakstan, and Kyrgyzstan. A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Uzbek (Cyrillic), Uzbek (Latin)
    A Turkic language. The official language of Uzbekistan, spoken also in China and Afghanistan. A mother tongue for some 31 million people.
  • Welsh
    A Celtic language spoken in Wales (Great Britain). A mother tongue for some 580 thousand people.
  • Wolof
    A Niger-Congo language (West Atlantic branch). The official language of Senegal, spoken also in the Gambia and Mauritania. A mother tongue for some 7 million people.
  • Xhosa
    A Bantu language spoken in the Republic of South Africa. A mother tongue for some 8 million people.
  • Yakut
    A Turkic language spoken in Russia (Yakutia). A mother tongue for some 400 thousand people.
  • Yiddish
    A Germanic language historically spoken by Ashkenazi Jews. Approximately 11 million speakers worldwide at the beginning of the 20 century.
  • Zapotec
    An Indian language spoken in South Mexico. A mother tongue for some 430 thousand people.
  • Zulu
    A Bantu language spoken in the Republic of South Africa and Zimbabwe. A mother tongue for some 9.2 million people.

Artificial Languages

  • Esperanto
    The most popular artificial language introduced by L.L. Zamenhoff in 1887. Spoken in 83 countries worldwide by some 100,000 people. Around 30,000 books have been published in Esperanto.
  • Interlingua
    Introduced in 1903 by the famous mathematician Giuseppe Peano, reworked in mid-20th century by the linguist A.Gode. Some scientific journals publish abstracts in Interlingua.
  • Ido
    Introduced in 1907 by L. de Beaufront. A reworked version of Esperanto. Never acquired any considerable popularity.
  • Occidental
    Introduced in 1921–1922 by A.Wale. Never acquired any considerable popularity.

Formal Languages

  • Basic
    BASIC (for Beginners All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code), a programming language developed in the mid-1960s by John G. Kemeney and Thomas E. Kurz, professors at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, USA.
  • C/C++
    A programming language developed in 1972 by Dennis M. Ritchie, a system programmer at “AT&T Bell Laboratories”. C++ was introduced by Bjarne Stroustrup of the same “AT&T Bell Laboratories” in the early 1980s. The name indicates an evolution of C.
  • COBOL
    COBOL (for Common Business-Oriented Language), a programming language developed by computer manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Defense in 1959.
  • Digits

    Recognizes Arabic numerals, brackets, and mathematical symbols.

  • Fortran
    FORTRAN (for FORmula TRANslator), a programming language developed by IBM in the mid-1950s.
  • Java
    Java is an evolution of the Oak programming language, introduced in 1995 by Sun Microsystems. Java syntax is much like C++. Java is used for writing Internet applications.
  • Pascal
    A programming language named in the honor of the French mathematician and philosopher Blaise Pascal, developed by Niklaus Wirth of the Federal Institute of Te
    chnology, Zürich, Switzerland, in the late 1960s.
  • Simple chemical formulas
    Chemical formulas made up of chemical element names and subscript numbers, e.g. H2O, C2H5OH.

Finereader listpicture Supported Languages For details, see Languages and Their Fonts.

*Information about the number of speakers as of 2002.

Supported Languages